Short Reviews (1-2 Star Rating)

A Few Fiction Flops

I told you all a while back that I meant to make an effort to read new genres, hoping to appeal to a variety of reading tastes. The line-up of historical fiction reviews lately attests to the lack of success I’ve had so far! Here are two books I’ve tried recently and just couldn’t finish.

ManHeNeverWas1E

First off–the book I was so certain I would love–The Man He Never Was by James L. Rubart. Promising an interesting plot (a man wakes up with no memory of where he’s been for months and discovers he’s a new person, free of the anger he used to struggle with) in a more uncommon genre (speculative Christian fiction), I was all set to gobble this story up. Disappointingly, several contradictions of the book either frustrated or offended me. A Christian character pours out prayers and then only four pages later seemingly takes God’s name in vain. Rubart’s earlier book Rooms (which I enjoyed) had some very allegorical/ spiritual elements, but this story went so far with them that it felt mystic and new age. Here’s an excerpt that should make clear what I mean: Continue reading “A Few Fiction Flops”

Short Reviews (1-2 Star Rating)

Fiction Flop Short Review, May 21st

Pharaoh's Daughter
Thank you to my sister-in-law Emily for the lovely bracelet!

The Pharaoh’s Daughter—Written by Mesu Andrews

An imagining of the life of Pharaoh’s daughter, fearful that Anubis-the god of the afterlife- may try to take her at any moment. Ties in with 1 Chronicles 4:18, which names a daughter of Pharaoh who marries into the tribe of Judah.

A very intriguing idea for a novel but in my opinion not well executed. I feel some Bible passages are interpreted strangely; for example, in Exodus 2:9-10 Pharaoh’s daughter instructs Jochebed to take Moses (in my Bible the wording is take this child away)  but this novel has Jochebed and Moses live with pharaoh’s daughter in her chambers for years. Apart from this, some fictional elements rubbed me the wrong way. At one point a Jew proposes marriage to a woman while his previous wife is still lying dead, not even buried yet, in the house. The timing as written seemed very contrived and unnecessary to me.

Overall the novel treated the Biblical events and characters with reverence, and there were some beautiful messages woven in (my favorite was an overarching arc about one character’s names and how they define her– eventually culminating in her receiving the name Bithiah, which means daughter of God). I still believe this author has promise and I would be interested to see what else she has to offer– with the right plot I think she could go far. –2/5 stars

Thoughts? Disagree? Ready for a full review? Sutter’s Cross, coming up! Thank you so much, friends!